Box-N-Flow

Kimberly Spreen
Year Released: 2004

Categories: Boxing/Kickboxing/Martial Arts


I’m reviewing this workout after doing it a number of times since receiving it several months ago.

General workout breakdown: This starts out with a fairly lengthy warm-up--about 7 minutes. It gets into the moves fairly quickly and has some dynamic stretching. The cardio portion is relatively short--about 26 minutes--but intense. Kimberly builds combinations and does little variations of them, then switches to the other side with the same progressions (when applicable; some combinations are done facing front and therefore don't have another "side"). She does a lot more upper body (i.e. punches) than lower body (i.e. kicks), which I personally like, but I know kick-lovers miss their kicks with this one. She does the standard jab, cross, upper cut, hook, and speed bag arms, although she does have a combination where she has you pretend to hit someone, working your way down their body, including rib jab (or whatever similar names she gives it). For kicks, she includes front, back, and round plus knee strikes and side chambers. There are some squats, jumping jacks, scissor jumps, etc., but the focus is primarily on kickboxing moves. The cool down is long--about 15 minutes--and is done entirely standing. You do some slowed down kickboxing moves (i.e. leg lifts), tai chi inspired moves, balance challenges, and stretches. Again, Kimberly repeats each progression evenly on each side where applicable.

Level: I'd say Box-N-Flow is best for at least solidly intermediate exercisers (not using hand weights) through low/mid-advanced (using hand weights). There’s some impact with the jumps, including some plyometric moves. Prior kickboxing or martial arts experience is necessary, as Kimberly offers little in the way of form instruction, although she has good form pointers

Class: 2 young women join Kimberly. One shows modifications during the cool down; otherwise there aren’t really any modifications given.

Music / Set / Other Production Notes: This is a Sara City production, so the set's pretty boring (wood floor, blank walls, shelves with boxing gloves) and production values are decent but nothing special. The cool down music also appears in Karen Voight's Abs & Back, and the kickboxing workout is standard beat-driven stuff.

Equipment: sneakers. Kimberly and crew have on gloves, which appear to be weighted.

Comments: You’ll need some space for this. You should be able to step and kick to each side as well as to the front. There are some partial pivots and shuffles for those of you on carpet.

DVD Notes: From the main menu you can select “Intro/Warm Up,” “Activity,” and “Cooldown/Stretch.” You can’t skip the warnings & cautions and long (about 2 min.) Sara City introduction before the warm up. And the chapters within the activity dump you right in the middle of a combination or routine; there’s no obvious rhyme or reason to them.

Conclusion: I’m keeping this one. It’s not the most exciting kickboxing workout I own, but I like it for variety. I enjoy the upper body focus, and the short, intense cardio is good for a time crunch, although the long cool down throws a bit of a wrench into that plan. I definitely like Kimberly’s style of instruction. I haven’t tried her Triple Threat, so I can’t compare that one to this. I’m waiting for the (supposedly longer) kickboxing workout that rumor has it Kimberly is planning.

Instructor Comments:
I like Kimberly a lot in this video. She comes off as approachable, encouraging, and not at all hyper. She cues well, giving you enough warning of new moves (even too much in a couple of cases) and intending for you to mirror her moves. She addresses you, asking you if you’re willing to do a little more with her. She's like the gem of an aerobics instructor you stumble across at your local gym and don't want to tell anyone about because if you do her classes will be too crowded to move. I’m no expert on kickboxing, but her form looks good to me.

KathAL79

08/15/2005